Sand Creek Science Teacher Attends Summer G-Camp

Stacey Sebert, Sand Creek MIddle School science teacher, had the pleasure of attending EARTH (Education and Research: Testing Hypotheses) in Monterey Bay California this past July.

EARTH was hosted by MBARI (Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute) along with Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (Polar-ICE) and Center for Dark Energy Biosphere Investigations (C-DEBI). In order to attend EARTH, Sebert had to review a lesson created by teachers in the EARTH program and complete an online feedback rubric. She reviewed a lesson on ocean acidification – which showed what would happen to shells if the ocean were to become more acidic and presented her findings at the workshop. EARTH participants then worked with research scientists, creating curriculum based on their research in order to disseminate that information into classrooms.

Working with teachers all over the US, Sebert created a unit on glaciers that she is excited to bring back to her classroom. During the week long workshop, teachers were given a tour of the Monterey Bay Aquarium and Research Center as well as the Seymour Marine Discovery Center. Participants were also able to kayak in Santa Cruz – getting up close and personal with sea life such as sea otters, seals, whales, and dolphins – a great field experience that reinforced the studies they were presented with earlier in the conference. If you are interested in the glacier unit, ocean acidification lesson, or other similar lessons, and would like to try them out in your own classroom, the website link to EARTH lessons is listed below:

http://www.mbari.org/products/educational-resources/earth/earth-lesson-plan-finder/

All lessons are free, complete with the standards (NGSS) they cover, and courtesy of EARTH. Pictures are of some of the devices and boats they use to conduct their research. It’s amazing what it costs to conduct research for a day! There’s a glider and diver devices pictured as well as a device that captures jellyfish to tag them. The whale bones are of a blue whale (the largest of its kind).